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Comparative defamation and privacy law / Ed. by Andrew T. Kenyon.

By: Kenyon, Andrew T, Ed.
Contributor(s): Kenyon, Andrew T, Ed.
Series: Cambridge intellectual property and information law.Publisher: New York: Cambridge University Press, 2016Description: 388 p.ISBN: 9781107123649 (hardback).Subject(s): Freedom of expression -- Congresses | Privacy -- Congresses | Libel and slander -- CongressesDDC classification: 346.034 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: 1. Defamation and privacy in an era of 'more speech' Andrew T. Kenyon; 2. 'Anyone... in any medium'? The scope of Canada's responsible communication defence Hilary Young; 3. 'Ceci n'est pas une pipe': the autopoietic inanity of the single meaning rule Andrew Scott; 4. New York Times v. Sullivan at 50 years: defamation in separate orbits David Partlett; 5. Defamation and democracy Russell L. Weaver; 6. 'A reasonable expectation of privacy': a coherent or redundant concept? Eric Barendt; 7. The effects of media intrusion into grief: a case study Nicole Moreham and Yvette Tinsley; 8. Press freedom, the public interest and privacy Gavin Phillipson; 9. The Atlantic divide on privacy and free speech Kirsty Hughes and Neil M. Richards; 10. The 'right to be forgotten' by search engines under data privacy law: a legal and policy analysis of the Costeja decision David Lindsay; 11. 'Privacy for the weak, transparency for the powerful' Melissa de Zwart; 12. The trouble with dignity Amy Gajda; 13. The uncertain landscape of Article 8 of the ECHR: the protection of reputation as a fundamental human right? Tanya Aplin and Jason Bosland; 14. Vindicating reputation and privacy David Rolph; 15. Divining the dignity torts: a possible future for defamation and privacy Ursula Cheer; 16. Reverberations of Sullivan? Considering defamation and privacy law reform Andrew T. Kenyon and Megan Richardson.
Summary: "Defamation and privacy are now two central issues in media law. While defamation law has long posed concerns for media publications, the emergence of privacy as a legal challenge has been relatively recent in many common law jurisdictions outside the US. A number of jurisdictions have seen recent defamation and privacy law reforms, which have often drawn on, or reacted against, developments elsewhere. This timely book examines topical issues in defamation and privacy law focused on media, journalism and contemporary communication. Aimed at a wide legal audience, it brings together leading and emerging analysts of media law to address current and proposed reforms and the impact of changes in communication environments, and to re-examine basic principles such as harm and free speech. This book will be of interest to all those working on commonwealth or US law, as well as comparative scholars from wider jurisdictions"--
List(s) this item appears in: New Additions March-April 2019
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Books Books Mahatma Gandhi University Library
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346.034 Q6 (Browse shelf) Available 59373
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Includes papers presented at a workshop was held at the Centre for Media and Communications Law at the University of Melbourne.--ECIP preface and acknowledgements.

Machine generated contents note: 1. Defamation and privacy in an era of 'more speech' Andrew T. Kenyon; 2. 'Anyone... in any medium'? The scope of Canada's responsible communication defence Hilary Young; 3. 'Ceci n'est pas une pipe': the autopoietic inanity of the single meaning rule Andrew Scott; 4. New York Times v. Sullivan at 50 years: defamation in separate orbits David Partlett; 5. Defamation and democracy Russell L. Weaver; 6. 'A reasonable expectation of privacy': a coherent or redundant concept? Eric Barendt; 7. The effects of media intrusion into grief: a case study Nicole Moreham and Yvette Tinsley; 8. Press freedom, the public interest and privacy Gavin Phillipson; 9. The Atlantic divide on privacy and free speech Kirsty Hughes and Neil M. Richards; 10. The 'right to be forgotten' by search engines under data privacy law: a legal and policy analysis of the Costeja decision David Lindsay; 11. 'Privacy for the weak, transparency for the powerful' Melissa de Zwart; 12. The trouble with dignity Amy Gajda; 13. The uncertain landscape of Article 8 of the ECHR: the protection of reputation as a fundamental human right? Tanya Aplin and Jason Bosland; 14. Vindicating reputation and privacy David Rolph; 15. Divining the dignity torts: a possible future for defamation and privacy Ursula Cheer; 16. Reverberations of Sullivan? Considering defamation and privacy law reform Andrew T. Kenyon and Megan Richardson.

"Defamation and privacy are now two central issues in media law. While defamation law has long posed concerns for media publications, the emergence of privacy as a legal challenge has been relatively recent in many common law jurisdictions outside the US. A number of jurisdictions have seen recent defamation and privacy law reforms, which have often drawn on, or reacted against, developments elsewhere. This timely book examines topical issues in defamation and privacy law focused on media, journalism and contemporary communication. Aimed at a wide legal audience, it brings together leading and emerging analysts of media law to address current and proposed reforms and the impact of changes in communication environments, and to re-examine basic principles such as harm and free speech. This book will be of interest to all those working on commonwealth or US law, as well as comparative scholars from wider jurisdictions"--

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