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Rethinking political Islam / Ed. by Shadi Hamid and William McCants.

By: Hamid, Shadi, Ed.
Contributor(s): Hamid, Shadi, Ed | McCants, William F, Ed.
Publisher: London: Oxford University Press, 2017Description: xviii, 377 p.ISBN: 9780190649203.Subject(s): Islam and politics -- Middle EastDDC classification: 320.557 Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Egypt / Steven Max Brooke -- Tunisia / Monia Marks -- Morocco / Avi Spiegel -- Syria / Raphaël Lefèvre -- Yemen / Stacey Philbrick Yadav -- Libya / Omar Ashour -- Saudi Arabia / Toby Matthiesen -- Kuwait / Courtney Freer -- Jordan / David Siddhartha Patel -- Pakistan / Matthew Nelson -- Southeast Asia / Joseph Chinyong Liow -- Islamism and U.S. foreign policy / Peter Mandaville -- Politics or piety? : why the Muslim Brotherhood engages in socal service provision / Amr Darrag, Freedom and Justice Party leader, in conversation with Steven Brooke -- Ennahda from within : Islamists or "Muslim democrats"? / Sayida Ounissi, Ennahda member of the Tunisian Parliament, in conversation with Monica Marks -- Is the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood pushing the group toward violence? / Ammar Fayed, Muslim Brotherhood -- The Islamist experience in Pakistan / Asif Luqman Qazi, Jamaat-e-Islami -- More than the Muslim Brotherhood : the problem of Hamas and Jordan's Islamic movement / Nael al-Masalha, of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood in conversation with Shadi Hamid -- How much do organizational structures matter? / Jacob Olidort in conversation with Raphaël Lefèvre -- How "religious" are ISIS fighters? : the relationship between religious literacy and religious motivation / Andrew Lebovich -- Do Islamists have an intellectual deficit? / Ovamir Anjum.
Summary: The "twin shocks" of the Egyptian coup and the rise of ISIS have challenged conventional wisdom on political Islam, forcing scholars and Muslim activists to reconsider some of the basic assumptions about Sunni Islamist movements. While ISIS and other jihadist groups garner the most media attention, the vast majority of Islamists are of the mainstream variety, seeking gradual change and participating in parliamentary politics when they're allowed to. It is these groups that are the focus of this book. They not only represent the future of what we call "political Islam," but they also - in their own struggles adapting to the changes of recent years - provide a fascinating window into a rapidly changing Middle East. The breadth of the book is expansive, covering the experience of Islamist groups in twelve countries: Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Jordan, and Pakistan, as well as Malaysia and Indonesia. In each of these cases, contributors consider how Muslim Brotherhood and Brotherhood-inspired Islamist movements have grappled with fundamental questions, including gradual versus revolutionary approaches to change, the use of tactical or situational violence, attitudes toward the nation-state, and how ideology and political variables interact. The case studies include authoritarian and democratic states and are not solely focused on the Arab world, allowing readers to consider a greater diversity of Islamist experiences.
List(s) this item appears in: New additions July-August 2019
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Books Books Mahatma Gandhi University Library
General Stacks
320.557 Q7 (Browse shelf) Available 59888
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 309-361) and index.

Egypt / Steven Max Brooke -- Tunisia / Monia Marks -- Morocco / Avi Spiegel -- Syria / Raphaël Lefèvre -- Yemen / Stacey Philbrick Yadav -- Libya / Omar Ashour -- Saudi Arabia / Toby Matthiesen -- Kuwait / Courtney Freer -- Jordan / David Siddhartha Patel -- Pakistan / Matthew Nelson -- Southeast Asia / Joseph Chinyong Liow -- Islamism and U.S. foreign policy / Peter Mandaville -- Politics or piety? : why the Muslim Brotherhood engages in socal service provision / Amr Darrag, Freedom and Justice Party leader, in conversation with Steven Brooke -- Ennahda from within : Islamists or "Muslim democrats"? / Sayida Ounissi, Ennahda member of the Tunisian Parliament, in conversation with Monica Marks -- Is the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood pushing the group toward violence? / Ammar Fayed, Muslim Brotherhood -- The Islamist experience in Pakistan / Asif Luqman Qazi, Jamaat-e-Islami -- More than the Muslim Brotherhood : the problem of Hamas and Jordan's Islamic movement / Nael al-Masalha, of the Jordanian Muslim Brotherhood in conversation with Shadi Hamid -- How much do organizational structures matter? / Jacob Olidort in conversation with Raphaël Lefèvre -- How "religious" are ISIS fighters? : the relationship between religious literacy and religious motivation / Andrew Lebovich -- Do Islamists have an intellectual deficit? / Ovamir Anjum.

The "twin shocks" of the Egyptian coup and the rise of ISIS have challenged conventional wisdom on political Islam, forcing scholars and Muslim activists to reconsider some of the basic assumptions about Sunni Islamist movements. While ISIS and other jihadist groups garner the most media attention, the vast majority of Islamists are of the mainstream variety, seeking gradual change and participating in parliamentary politics when they're allowed to. It is these groups that are the focus of this book. They not only represent the future of what we call "political Islam," but they also - in their own struggles adapting to the changes of recent years - provide a fascinating window into a rapidly changing Middle East. The breadth of the book is expansive, covering the experience of Islamist groups in twelve countries: Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Syria, Yemen, Libya, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Jordan, and Pakistan, as well as Malaysia and Indonesia. In each of these cases, contributors consider how Muslim Brotherhood and Brotherhood-inspired Islamist movements have grappled with fundamental questions, including gradual versus revolutionary approaches to change, the use of tactical or situational violence, attitudes toward the nation-state, and how ideology and political variables interact. The case studies include authoritarian and democratic states and are not solely focused on the Arab world, allowing readers to consider a greater diversity of Islamist experiences.

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